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Thursday, July 9, 2020 | History

4 edition of Assessing big sagebrush at multiple spatial scales found in the catalog.

Assessing big sagebrush at multiple spatial scales

Michael G. Karl

Assessing big sagebrush at multiple spatial scales

an example in southeast Oregon

by Michael G. Karl

  • 184 Want to read
  • 10 Currently reading

Published by Bureau of Land Management, National Science and Technology Center in [Denver, Colo.] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Oregon.
    • Subjects:
    • Big sagebrush -- Ecology -- Oregon.,
    • Sagebrush -- Ecology -- Oregon.,
    • Sage grouse -- Habitat -- Oregon.,
    • Habitat (Ecology) -- Oregon.,
    • Vegetation monitoring -- Oregon.,
    • Vegetation dynamics -- Oregon.,
    • Range ecology -- Oregon.

    • About the Edition

      This technical note describes how big sagebrush habitats (Artemisia tridentata, including Wyoming, basin, and mountain subspecies) are being assessed and managed at multiple spatial scales within a Bureau of Land Management resource area in southeast Oregon. It shows how the assessment results can be used to make determinations pertaining to standards and guidelines for greater sage-grouse and other animals that use sagebrush habitats.

      Edition Notes

      Statementby Mike "Sherm" Karl and Jon Sadowski.
      SeriesTechnical note ;, 417, Technical note (United States. Bureau of Land Management) ;, 417.
      ContributionsSadowski, Jon., United States. Bureau of Land Management., National Science and Technology Center (U.S.), National Science and Technology Center (U.S.). Branch of Publishing Services.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQL84.2 .U54a vol. 417
      The Physical Object
      Paginationiii, 41 p. :
      Number of Pages41
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3467157M
      LC Control Number2005452178
      OCLC/WorldCa61482449

      Remotely sensed data products depicting physical and ecological attributes of a landscape are becoming invaluable tools in wildlife and rangeland management. However, if such geospatial tools and data layers are to be used in management, their accuracy and appropriateness for such use needs to be vetted and validated. We assessed accuracy of two National Land Cover Database (NLCD) shrubland.   The Southern Great Basin includes the southern‐ and westernmost populations of sage‐grouse. MZ III is the most arid of all the management zones and includes a mix of Wyoming big sagebrush, mountain big sagebrush (A. tridentata var. vaseyana), low sagebrush (A. arbuscula), and black sagebrush (A. nova). Topography is rugged with sagebrush on Cited by:

      Climate change has the potential to enhance or disrupt biological systems, but currently, little is known about how organism plasticity may facilitate adaptation to localised climate variation. The bee-flower relationship is an exemplar signal-receiver system that may provide important insights into the complexity of ecological interactions in situations like by: Measuring boundary convexity at multiple spatial scales using a linear "moving window" analysis: an application to coastal river otter habitat selection. Landscape Ecology 25(10): Top of Page Jeffrey Beck. Doherty, K. E., J. L. Beck, and D. E. Naugle. Comparing ecological site descriptions to habitat characteristics.

      Goals / Objectives To study the change in fuel beds and fire potentials under different wildfire, land and fuel management scenarios. To develop a set of fuelbeds for the Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) representing the change in land and fuel management scenarios for a diversity of ecosystems from the boreal forest in Alaska to the tropics in Mexico and South America. aquatic and emergent vegetation communities across multiple spatial and temporal scales. The STM provides an adaptive framework to inform management and restoration to successfully achieve habitat-based objectives for wetland-dependent wildlife and increase resilience of wetlands to future changes in ecological processes.


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Assessing big sagebrush at multiple spatial scales by Michael G. Karl Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Assessing big sagebrush at multiple spatial scales: an example in southeast Oregon. [Michael G Karl; Jon Sadowski; National Science and Technology Center (U.S.)] -- This technical note describes how big sagebrush habitats (Artemisia tridentata, including Wyoming, basin, and mountain subspecies) are being assessed and managed at multiple spatial scales within a.

Assessing big sagebrush at multiple spatial scales: an example in southeast Oregon. Related Titles. Series: Technical note (United States. Bureau of Land Management) ; By. Karl, Michael G. Sadowski, Jon. United States. Bureau of Land Management. In the Wyoming Basin region, the top models explaining Brewer's sparrow, green-tailed towhee, sagebrush sparrow, and sage thrasher abundance included variables at multiple scales (e.g., all big.

Assessing big sagebrush at multiple spatial scales: an example in southeast Oregon by Michael G Karl () 2 editions published in in English and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide. Assessing Big Sagebrush at Multiple Spatial Scales: An Example in Southeast Oregon Karl BLM Technical Note Microclimate Effects from Closing Abandoned Mines with Culvert Bat Gates King BLM Technical Note Helium Resources of the United States, Gage BLM Technical Note Hazardous Waste Site Sampling Basics Innis Assessing big sagebrush at multiple spatial scales - an example in southeast Oregon () ().jpg 2, × 2,; MB Big sagebrush shrub-steppe postfire succession in southwest Montana () ().jpg 3, × 3,; MB.

Spatiotemporal mapping of the dry season vegetation response of sagebrush steppe Article (PDF Available) in Community Ecology 5(1) June with Reads How we measure 'reads'. If mountain big sagebrush stands require at least 26 to 30 years, on average, to reach unburned canopy cover of about 28%, sites with very frequent fire.

A voyage round the world with a history of the Oregon mission and notes of several years['] residence on the plans bordering the Pacific Ocean: comprising an account of interesting adventures among the Indians west of the Rocky Mountains: to which is appended a full description of Oregon Territory, its geography, history and religion, designed for the benefit of emigrants to that rising.

Fedy, B.C., and K.E. Doherty. Population cycles are highly correlated over long time series and large spatial scales in two unrelated species: greater sage. Assessment of sagebrush cover using remote sensing at multiple spatial and temporal scales.

Ecological Indicators. Freeman ED, Larsen RT, Peterson ME. Background. Balancing animal conservation and human use of the landscape is an ongoing scientific and practical challenge throughout the world.

We investigated reproductive success in female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) relative to seasonal patterns of resource selection, with the larger goal of developing a spatially-explicit framework for managing human activity and sage Cited by: The Gunnison Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus minimus) is a species of conservation concern and is a candidate for listing under the U.S.

Endangered Species Act because of substantial declines in populations from historic levels. It is thought that loss, fragmentation, and deterioration of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) habitat have contributed to the decline and isolation of this species into seven Cited by: 4.

Current trends in hydrogeology seek to enlist sedimentary concepts in the interpretation of permeability structures. However, existing conceptual models of alluvial deposition tend to inadequately account for the heterogeneity caused by complex sedimentological and external factors.

This. Sagebrush, greater sage-grouse, and the occurrence and importance of forbs: Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) ecosystems provide habitat for sagebrush-obligate wildlife species such as the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). The understory of big sagebrush plant communities is composed of grasses Department of Ecosystem Science and Management University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, USA.

Hess, J. E., and Beck, J. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nesting and early brood-rearing habitat response to mowing and prescribed burning Wyoming big sagebrush and influence of disturbance factors on lek persistence in the. The LTDL can be used by federal managers and scientists for compiling information for data-calls, producing maps, generating reports, and conducting analyses at varying spatial and temporal scales.

Attribution: Sage-grouse & Sagebrush Ecosystem, Region 5: Missouri Basin, Region 9: Columbia-Pacific Northwest, Region 7: Upper Colorado Basin. Soil thickness was ~50 cm deeper at the aspen soil pit than at the sagebrush soil pit, but this difference was not apparent across broader spatial scales (Figure 1).

Rather, soil thickness varied considerably in the aspen grove with some locally deep soils that may have supplied water to the aspen trees in the late dry by: 4.

We sampled sagebrush canopy cover and density alongm transects. When comparing sagebrush presence, we found discrepancies 24−27% of the time ().Kappa values were and for the m pixels and m mean values, respectively (see Table 1).These values suggest a “fair” level of agreement between the NLCD layer and our field data (Landis and Koch,Tang et al., Author: Lindsey A.

Parsons, Jonathan A. Jenks, Andrew J. Gregory. Some Wyoming big sagebrush and basin big sagebrush communities—and many community types adjacent to Wyoming big sagebrush and basin big sagebrush communities, such as low sagebrush, black sagebrush, and salt desert shrub communities—have sparse, discontinuous fine fuels that may slow fire spread or act as fuel breaks (see Large Fires).

Spatial heterogeneity of vegetation is an important landscape characteristic, but is difficult to assess due to scale-dependence. Here we examine how spatial patterns in the forest canopy affect those of understory plants, using the shrub Canada buffaloberry (Shepherdia canadensis (L.) Nutt.) as a focal species.

Evergreen and deciduous forest canopy and buffaloberry shrub presence were Cited by: 5.Two recent studies found that Mn, Zn, K, and Mg were repeatedly positively correlated with BSC mosses and lichens at multiple spatial scales (Bowker et al.a).

Additional research is necessary to determine the effects of various fertilization regimens on BSC organisms and on exotic invasive plant species that could potentially benefit Cited by: The traditional means of monitoring rangelands are neither statistically reliable nor economically feasible.

The traditional approaches used locally are difficult to scale upward. Unique properties of landscapes only emerge as land is looked at with coarser scales (West ). The following project proposes fresh approaches utilizing remote sensing imagery in a regional context to monitoring.